Progress Reports

Trimester Report: March - July 2016

This report covers the progress of RAP3 over the third trimester of FY 2072-73, 16th March to 15th July 2016. It provides data and information relating to progress of RAP3 over the last trimester. A Summary reviews the physical and financial progress of RAP at the end of the last trimester. This shows cumulative physical progress at 86.2%, time elapsed at 80.7% and financial progress at 80%, all nicely grouped. The summary also lists activities carried out last trimester and those planned for the next trimester.

Review of the RAP 3 Performance Management and Verification (PMV) System

The PMV Review Report is a MEL-led independent review of the existing Performance Management and Verification (PMV) system of RAP. The PMV system is RAP’s internal M&E system used to collect, aggregate and report data related to completed activities from the district to the central level. It is used to report results to DFID as well as drive performance management within RAP. The main objective of the report is to assess if RAP’s PMV is fit for purpose. The review examined existing RAP polices, systems and processes, identified strengths and areas for improvement and provided recommendations for addressing the more significant areas of improvement.

Learning Note 1: Re-examining RAP in Nepal's Development Context

This report reviews the implementation of the Local Roads Network (LRN) component of RAP. The objectives of the LRN review were to: a) develop a quantitative analysis of RAP3 LRN; b) assess the effectiveness of current RAP3 LRN approaches in a sample of RAP 3 districts in delivering results and value for money; c) develop recommendations on the future effective delivery of the RAP LRN component.

LRN Review

This report reviews the implementation of the Local Roads Network (LRN) component of RAP. The objectives of the LRN review were to: a) develop a quantitative analysis of RAP3 LRN; b) assess the effectiveness of current RAP3 LRN approaches in a sample of RAP 3 districts in delivering results and value for money; c) develop recommendations on the future effective delivery of the RAP LRN component.

RAP Beneficiaries RCA Report

This Reality Check Approach (RCA) Study complements a ‘baseline’ RCA that was undertaken for RAP in May 2014 and constitutes a ‘one-off’ thematic study. The RCA study focused on RAP beneficiaries and their communities. RCA is an internationally recognised form of qualitative research that requires the study team to live with people living in poverty in their own homes for periods of time.

Process Monitoring Briefing Note 1

This note summarises Process Monitoring Reports conducted by the Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) component of DFID-Nepal’s Rural Access Programme 3 (RAP3). The summary looks at beneficiaries of RAP’s socioeconomic development (SED) activities in the core districts of Kalikot, Accham, Bajura, Humla, Dailkeh and Jumla. A particular area of focus was analysing how poor and disadvantaged group (DAG) members were impacted by the SED activities and the associated constraints. This exercise was conducted during the implementation of the original SED model implemented by RAP. Since late 2015, the SED model has been revised significantly, hence the learnings from this briefing note only reflects issues arising from the original SED model implemented between 2014 and early 2015.

Process Monitoring Briefing Note 2

This note summarises Process Monitoring Reports conducted by the Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL) component of DFID-Nepal’s Rural Access Programme 3 (RAP3). The summary looks at migration and its linkages with the household economy among RAP beneficiaries in Dailkeh, Doti, Kalikot and Jumla. Migration is hugely significant throughout Nepal and the mid and far western districts are no exception. Migration from western areas to the Terai or India (and indeed within these Districts with mountain dwellers moving to the mid hills in winter) has been a regular seasonal choice for thousands of households for generations. The government and other development actors have implemented a number of public wage and social protection programmes to provide seasonal employment opportunities to help people in the mid and far west to cope with livelihood shocks and to address some of the consequences of distress migration. This exercise was conducted during the implementation of the original SED model implemented by RAP. Since late 2015, the SED model has been revised significantly, hence the learnings from this briefing note only reflects issues arising from the original SED model implemented between 2014 and early 2015.

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